The results of the October Pace of Play survey were shared with those who attended the Members’ Night on 21st October. For those who weren’t able to attend, here’s a summary.

The four questions we asked were:

  1. Assuming that you have the course to yourself, how long do you think it is reasonable for a 2-ball to take at Kilspindie?
Two-ball, course quiet2.

2. Assuming that you have the course to yourself, how long do you think it is reasonable for a 4-ball to take at Kilspindie?

Four-ball, course quiet

3. Assuming that the course is reasonably busy, how long do you think it is reasonable for a 2-ball to take at Kilspindie?

Two-ball, course busy

4. Assuming that the course is reasonably busy, how long do you think it is reasonable for a 4-ball to take at Kilspindie?

Four-ball, course busy

Analysis

These responses reveal a remarkable consensus about how long a round of golf at Kilspindie should take. If you imagine each piechart as a clock, then six o’clock represents the median score – around 2 hours 40 minutes for a two-ball with the course to itself, for instance. More importantly, the vast majority of members agree that the target time should be within 10-15 minutes of that figure.

If you’re playing in a fourball, you can add around 20 minutes to that target figure (i.e. a total of around 3 hours). If the course is busy a round might take a further 20-25 minutes.

In any survey, there are always some extreme responses: some people hold strong views; some misunderstand the question or simply press the wrong buttons by mistake; and the odd responder will simply give a bizarre answer. Despite that, this survey provided surprising agreement.

There are still real differences of opinion, though, so it’s a matter of striking a balance: slower groups need to be aware of their responsibility to let faster groups through, while faster groups behind need to be patient enough not to expect to get through immediately.

If, say, a four-ball decides to let a quicker two-ball group behind it through, watch out for the possibility of doing so by playing six balls off the same tee. The two can then walk quickly on and play, leaving the four behind to be more leisurely. It’s probably the most painless way.